micdotcom

micdotcom:

Here’s what sex — and other bodily functions — look like in an MRI machine

Ever wonder what’s really going on inside your body? And not just that lame classroom skeleton or those creepy, albeit kind of cool, Bodies exhibitions. No, you want something that really gives a good picture of what’s happening inside your body as you’re moving around… or as something is moving around inside your body.

To give us a better idea of what that kind of stuff looks like, Vox compiled snippets of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans that show just what’s actually happening inside your body in some everyday (and some NSFW) moments.

 Watch: Sex, birth, breathing and more

laliberty
laliberty:

Better. Now if only iCloud had the same privacy protections as Mega…

Here’s a new feature of iOS 8 that we weren’t expecting: Apple announced tonight that the new software makes it impossible for Apple to turn over the data on an iOS 8-equipped iPhone or iPad to U.S. law enforcement, even in the presence of a search warrant. Chalk one up for privacy.
This new legal and ethical stance from Apple is based on changes to the way iOS encryption works. With the newest version of Apple’s mobile software in place, the company can no longer bypass a user’s passcode—meaning that even if U.S. law enforcement presents Apple with a search warrant, the company is simply incapable of access passcode-protected data on a user’s device.

Apple will still be able to access any user data stored on iCloud, meaning a law enforcement request will compel the company to turn over iCloud files when presented with a warrant. But if the files only live on a user’s device, and not on the cloud, law enforcement’s out of luck.

laliberty:

Better. Now if only iCloud had the same privacy protections as Mega

Here’s a new feature of iOS 8 that we weren’t expecting: Apple announced tonight that the new software makes it impossible for Apple to turn over the data on an iOS 8-equipped iPhone or iPad to U.S. law enforcement, even in the presence of a search warrant. Chalk one up for privacy.

This new legal and ethical stance from Apple is based on changes to the way iOS encryption works. With the newest version of Apple’s mobile software in place, the company can no longer bypass a user’s passcode—meaning that even if U.S. law enforcement presents Apple with a search warrant, the company is simply incapable of access passcode-protected data on a user’s device.

Apple will still be able to access any user data stored on iCloud, meaning a law enforcement request will compel the company to turn over iCloud files when presented with a warrant. But if the files only live on a user’s device, and not on the cloud, law enforcement’s out of luck.